Fiction

Knocking on Heaven’s Door has just been released by Yucca Press/Skyhorse Publishing. In the 23rd century, humans now live in utopia, hunting and gathering in tribal bands, reunited with old (cloned) friends like the mammoth, connected by solar-powered laptops, and buoyed by the belief in a panpsychic universe in which consciousness pervades matter. A 150 years after the supervirus that killed most of humanity, our return to a Paleoterrific lifestyle seems to be our last, greatest achievement. But in this new Garden of Eden, one man and one woman—as well as a smarter-than-average dire-wolf–are faced with a decision that could literally transform the planet. Again. Will we repeat the cycle of curiosity and hubris? Or is our destiny even stranger than that?

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Teresa of the New World is a fabulist novel for Young Adults, set in the deep magic of the American Southwest in the sixteenth century. I have worked on this book for most of my life. Seemingly, this is about the fictional daughter of the real-life Spanish explorer Cabeza de Vaca and a Capoque mother, about a father’s love and a father’s betrayal, about plague and apocalypse and were-jaguars and a deep connection with the trickster earth. But, really, I think it is about me.

Readers! Please email me at Sharman Apt Russell with questions or comments. Also go on Goodreads and ask to be a friend and ask me a question there.

512px-Junior-Jaguar-Belize-Zoo(Photo: http://bjornfree.com/galleries.html)

Genre: Fiction
Teresa of the New World

Teresa of the New World

$14.99$12.02
Genre: Fiction
A story of magic and apocalypse set in the American Southwest of the sixteenth century, Teresa of the New World weaves together history and myth, real-life conquistadors and shape-shifting jaguars, the devastation of plague and the promise of home. More info →
Buy from Barnes and Noble.
Buy from Amazon.
Knocking on Heaven’s Door

Knocking on Heaven’s Door

Genre: Fiction
In the 23rd century, humans live in utopia, hunting and gathering in tribal bands, reunited with old (cloned) friends like the mammoth, connected by solar-powered laptops, buoyed by the belief in a panpsychic universe in which consciousness pervades matter. A 150 years after the supervirus that killed off most of humanity, our return to a Paleoterrific lifestyle seems to our last, greatest achievement. But in this new Garden of Eden, one man and one woman—as well as a smarter-than-average dire-wolf--are faced with a decision that could literally transform the planet. Again. Will we repeat the cycle of curiosity and hubris? Or is our destiny even stranger than that? More info →
Buy from Amazon.
The Last Matriarch

The Last Matriarch

$9.99 or kindleunlimited
Genre: Fiction
Over eleven thousand years ago the plains of the great Southwest were covered with sweet long-season grass. Herds of camels, bison, mammoths lived with predators like dire wolves, saber-toothed cats, and the hunter gatherers we now call the Clovis people. This story of Willow, Jak, Etol, and their clan takes place in a land that we unconsciously recognize, and shows us people whose needs, hopes, and fears are our own. They live in a world where communication with animals, plants, and even stones is not only possible but necessary. Willow's life path echoes that of Half Ear and Red Fur, the matriarchs of the woolly mammoth herd, and by joining their stories, Russell explores an archaeological puzzle: the extinction of nearly eighty percent of large land mammals at the end of the Pleistocene. The meaning of being human lies at the heart of the puzzle. Russell's imaginative reconstruction of the world of Willow and her clan illumines the tribal self--the basket maker, the mammoth hunter, the healer, the shaman--that still lives in each of us. More info →
Buy from Amazon Kindle.
The Humpbacked Fluteplayer

The Humpbacked Fluteplayer

$7.99 or kindleunlimited
Genre: Fiction
When May touches the crude cave drawing of a fluteplayer, she and Evan are transported to an alternate reality, where they become pawns in a tense intertribal battle, and finding the humpbacked fluteplayer again is their only hope for escape. More info →
Buy from Amazon Kindle.

 

 

 

river is the path that connects us

“River is the Path that Connects Us,” artwork by Zoe Wolfe

Council of Beings

Twelve-year-old Levi Vasquez lives with his mother and younger sister in a trailer on Sacaton Mesa, the brooding Mogollon Range to the north, more mountains and hills east, south, and west–a rippling expanse of land unfolding under the bright blue New Mexican sky. Levi knows this view like he knows how to breathe or ride a bicycle. Sometimes even, the mountains seem to be “watching” him, aware of the mornings he goes to school hungry or worries about his mom being sick. So when a powerful underground personality called the Dreamer comes down from the Mogollons to swell the earth under his feet, Levi is not completely surprised. When a band of long-tailed, long-nosed coati tell him he must attend the next Council of Beings, he suspects he doesn’t have a choice. The Council will be held on the winter solstice, and humans are past due to act as its host–as they have hosted such Councils before at places like Stonehenge, Easter Island, and the Hopewell Mounds. “Prepare the way,” the coati leader says, “bring a gift.”

But how does a sixth-grader begin such a task? How can he match the grandeur of these monuments from the past? Bound to fail, Levi gamely and sometimes glumly does his best, using the school computer for research, finding unexpected allies in an adolescent raven and a sympathetic teacher at school. As the solstice draws near, Levi’s gift to the Council takes on a surprising and satisfying shape, a gift inspired by the stuff of his life— his mother’s new boyfriend, the spokes of a bicycle wheel. Levi starts to feel pretty good about his “art project.” Perhaps he won’t fail after all.

Not everyone, however, wants humans to succeed at the Council of Beings. When Levi climbs nearby Bear Mountain as part of his preparations, he is threatened by the ghosts of grizzlies now extinct in the Southwest and the Paleolithic giant short-faced bear. Suddenly he must defend himself from adults in his rural valley who have allied with these forces. The Council of Beings is about the power of connection, a renewed contract with the earth, and these humans want that power for themselves. Suddenly Levi and his friends are in danger, and he must draw on resources he didn’t know he had.